POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS

Possible side effects of SARCLISA

Infusion reactions

SARCLISA is given by a healthcare provider as an intravenous (IV) infusion into your vein. Medicines given by IV infusion can sometimes cause unwanted reactions.

Infusion reactions are common with SARCLISA and can sometimes be severe or life threatening.

Infusion reactions are common with SARCLISA and can sometimes be severe or life threatening.

Your healthcare provider will prescribe medicines before each infusion of SARCLISA to help decrease your risk for infusion reactions or to help make any infusion reaction less severe. You will be monitored for infusion reactions during each dose of SARCLISA.

Your healthcare provider may slow down or stop your infusion, or completely stop treatment with SARCLISA if you have an infusion reaction.

Get medical help right away if you develop any of the following symptoms of infusion reaction during or after an infusion of SARCLISA:

  • shortness of breath, wheezing, or trouble breathing
  • swelling of the face, mouth, throat, or tongue
  • throat tightness
  • palpitations
  • dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting
  • headache
  • cough
  • rash or itching
  • nausea
  • runny or stuffy nose
  • chills

In 2 clinical trials studying
SARCLISA, most infusion reactions started during the first
infusion or the first treatment cycle and all infusion reactions resolved.

Decreased white blood cell counts

Decreased white blood cell counts are common with SARCLISA and certain white blood cells can be severely decreased. You may have an increased risk of getting certain infections, such as upper and lower respiratory tract infections and urinary tract infections.

Your healthcare provider will check your blood cell counts during treatment with SARCLISA. Your healthcare provider may prescribe an antibiotic or antiviral medicine to help prevent infection, or a medicine to help increase your white blood cell counts during treatment with SARCLISA.

Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any fever or symptoms of infection during treatment with SARCLISA.

Risk of new cancers

New cancers have happened in people during treatment with SARCLISA. Your healthcare provider will monitor you for new cancers during treatment with SARCLISA.

Change in blood tests

SARCLISA can affect the results of blood tests to match your blood type. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests to match your blood type before you start treatment with SARCLISA. Tell all of your healthcare providers that you are being treated with SARCLISA before receiving blood transfusions.

Heart failure

Heart failure can happen during treatment with SARCLISA in combination with carfilzomib and dexamethasone. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of the following symptoms:

  • trouble breathing
  • cough
  • swelling of your ankles, feet, or legs

Common side effects that may occur with SARCLISA in combination with Pomalyst® and dexamethasone

  • lung infection (pneumonia)
  • decreased red blood cell counts (anemia)
  • upper respiratory tract infection
  • decreased platelet counts (thrombocytopenia)
  • diarrhea

Common side effects that may occur with SARCLISA in combination with Kyprolis® and dexamethasone

  • upper respiratory tract infection
  • tiredness and weakness
  • high blood pressure
  • diarrhea
  • lung infection (pneumonia)
  • trouble breathing
  • trouble sleeping
  • bronchitis
  • cough
  • back pain
  • decreased red blood cells (anemia)
  • decreased platelet counts (thrombocytopenia)

These are not all the possible side effects of SARCLISA. For more information, ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist.

SARCLISA is not chemotherapy. SARCLISA is a targeted immunotherapy
that works with your immune system to help fight multiple myeloma.